Setting Goals

Instead of flitting from one knitting project to another and still having too many UFO’s (Un Finished Objects) lurking in project bags it occurs to me that if I just think about what I’m trying to accomplish and set goals for each project then I’ll probably find that I finish multiple projects more quickly.

After all we studied more than one subject in school, right? So why not apply that reasoning to my knitting? For instance: I can decide how many ‘teeth’ to knit on the Hitchhiker project in one sitting, how many rows on the Ludlow project at a time, how many inches of ribbing on the purple socks, and how far I can get with the gusset increases on the lacy socks in one sitting.

I’ll start by noting the time it takes to get to a certain point in each of the four projects, then set aside one when I reach that point and pick up the next project, etc. Makes perfect sense. Doesn’t it?

With the Ludlow and the Hitchhiker I will probably be better off in the long run by knitting for a particular period of time, say an hour before switching to another project. Each succeeding row on both of those projects gets longer and longer due to the increases at one side.

I’m switching off from one lacy sock to the next to get them to the same point. Such as: I’m half-way through the gusset increases on one sock so I put it aside to get to the same point in the other sock. Then, I’ll finish the gusset increases on one sock, then the other. Then, I’ll turn the heel on one sock, then the other. Then, I’ll knit the heel flap on one, then the other. When the heel flaps are done I’ll put both socks back on the same 40″ circular needle to knit the ribbing like I’m doing with the purple socks.

By working on both socks at the same time I don’t have a problem with my gauge being different like I do if I knit one entire sock and then knit the second sock afterwards. The same applies to working on a project a little every day instead of letting it lurk in a project bag for months before I remember it and drag it back out and begin knitting again.

I’m hoping to be more efficient and less haphazard with my multiple projects and I think I’m on the right track. The trick will be to work on all four projects every day. I have a habit of letting time get away from me and if I pay more attention to my time it is bound to improve my efficiency and the enjoyment I get from knitting.

Ahem. I took a minute to look through one of the baskets on the bottom shelf in the living room and unearthed another project. So, let’s make that FIVE current projects that will need my attention. Sigh. This is a cowl that I started months ago out of six mini skeins of Fishknits fingering yarn. I’m doing a spit splice to join the ends together for seamless knitting. I’m using a 16″ size 3 needle for a double-thick cowl. I’ll graft the opening closed when I’ve finished with the last mini skein.

It will look similar to this one, also knitted out of Fishknits mini skeins but with five instead of six mini skeins.

Published by thenerdyyarnlady

I am a Native Texan, Wife, Mother, Grandmother, Great-Grandmother, Catholic Convert residing in rural North East Texas since 1975 when I married my husband and this small town girl became a country girl. I was taught to knit at the age of ten and discovered the writings of Elizabeth Zimmerman shortly after I married. I learned to ‘unvent’ things as I went along, to create my own patterns and generally have a blast with yarn and needles. In the mid 1980’s I explored the idea of spinning my own yarn and eventually got interested in weaving on a floor loom. I have three spinning wheels and a 24″ four-shaft Herald floor loom that I purchased from a friend in the 1990’s. I also enjoy sewing, tatting and making rosaries. I have a work room that contains my fiber, yarn, floor loom, sewing machines, serger and rosary making supplies. I have a spinning corner in a bedroom next to my work room, both with north windows looking toward the creek.

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